Isaac I. Ullah, PhD bio photo

Isaac I. Ullah, PhD

Computational Archaeology, Complex Adaptive Systems, Social-Ecological Systems, Geoarchaeology

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NetLogo-Web models for teaching

Overview

List of Web-Based Models

These are models that I host here for my classes. Some are made or modified by me, others I am re-hosting for convenience. To run each model, just click the link and it will load in a new tab. The credits and instructions are in the “Info” tab for each model (bottom of the page).

NetLogo Models for Class that are not web-based

The NetoLogo software will run on Mac, Windows, and Linux systems (sorry, no Chromebooks or iPads!). First download NetLogo 6.1.1. These models will likely not run in earlier versions of NetLogo. Then, download the .zip archives below, and unzip them on your computer (for help with .zip files on Mac and Windows read this article). It’s important to keep all the files in the archive together in the same folder when you unzip them. You can run the models by using the File -> Open function in NetLogo, and then navigating to the “.nlogo” file of the model you want to run.

  • The BACO Model Marco Vidal-Cordasco (2020, October 09). “The Bronze Age Collapse model (BACO model)” (Version 1.1.0). CoMSES Computational Model Library. Retrieved from: https://www.comses.net/codebases/dea16fd0-f56b-420e-a4c2-d151ffa3f2a8/releases/1.1.0/
  • City Sandbox Javier Sandoval (2020, January 09). “City Sandbox” (Version 1.0.0). CoMSES Computational Model Library. Retrieved from: https://www.comses.net/codebases/acc61c38-4a67-4183-868f-d11fe70aa290/releases/1.0.0/
  • The Urban Sprawl model is included in NetLogo as a sample model. Go to File > Model Library, and search for “Urban Sprawl”

Another good model to explore is the “MayaSim” model, but you will need to download an older verion of NetLogo 5.0.4.

Building a Simple NetLogo Model

Come back for an updated tutorial for building a simple model of human movement/dispersal courtesy of Dr. Iza Romanowska and Dr. Colin Wren. It will be an updated version of their dispersal tutorial found on Simulating Complexity.